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Delaware Valley Journal (DE): Allowing Heavier Trucks in Pennsylvania Will Make Our Roads More Dangerous

Pennsylvania’s county sheriffs join the Pennsylvania Chiefs of Police Association in strongly opposing legislation increasing truck weights that is under consideration in Harrisburg. Scott Bohn, executive director of the police chiefs group, noted in a recent commentary that, “Not only do bigger trucks cause more damage to roads and bridges, but they also threaten the safety of the public.” He is spot on. Read More+…

Staten Island Live (NY): New York’s bridges would suffer under bigger trucks

Congress is mulling proposals that could dramatically increase the allowable size of trucks on the nation’s highways — a decision that would be disastrous for New York bridges. A recent analysis by Bloomberg Government ranks New York state the eighth worst state in the nation for National Highway System (NHS) Bridges. The NHS is a network of strategic highways within the United States, including the Interstate Highway System. Read More+…

The Daily Star (LA): Congress Pushes for Bigger Trucks

Innovative solutions are required to address our pressing transportation and infrastructure needs. But allowing heavier and longer trucks on our roadways – as many are pressing Congress to do – is not one of them. This would create an urgent threat, indeed. Read More+…

New Haven Register (CT): Bigger trucks on Conn. roads are environmental polluters, public dangers

As an environmentalist and local elected official in Hamden, I am deeply concerned about renewed efforts underway that would allow massive trucks on the roads, which would increase pollution, undermine motorist safety and damage roads and bridges. Current proposals in Congress include increasing the weight limit of trucks from 80,000 pounds to 91,000 pounds and the length of double trailer trucks from 81 feet to 91 feet. Members of the Connecticut congressional delegation even supported at one point increasing truck…

Dallas Morning News (TX): Don’t allow bigger, heavier trucks on our roads

In North Texas, we need innovative solutions to address our pressing transportation and infrastructure needs. As we return to more in-person work, school and leisure, we will get back on the road, and our frustrating traffic and road infrastructure problems will return, too. One thing that will not solve this problem is allowing heavier and longer trucks on our roadways — as many are pressing Congress to do. Read More+…

Lafayette Leader (IN): Hoosiers overwhelmingly reject bigger trucks

The poll, commissioned by the Coalition Against Bigger Trucks and conducted by McLaughlin and Associates, showed a strong majority of respondents (57 percent to 27 percent) oppose legislation currently under consideration in the Indiana General Assembly that would increase the maximum weight of trucks from 80,000 pounds to 120,00 pounds. When asked whose opinion they trusted most on this issue, 52 percent of respondents said law enforcement and safety groups followed by truck drivers at 24 percent – two groups…

KFYR 5 (ND): Lawmakers want longer trucks, but drivers don’t

Smaller truck owners say this is going to be dangerous for the trucks and the drivers. Adding that many won’t be able to maneuver the trucks if they get longer, AND THAT the roads may not be able to handle the weights. “When the maximum weight and length of a vehicle exceeds our infrastructure capabilities, that’s when we have safety and infrastructure issues,” said Arik Spencer of the North Dakota Motor Carriers Association. Read More+…

The Gazette (OH): Mayor opposes bigger, heavier trucks moving through Medina Public Square

“Heavier trucks cause more damage to roads,” Hanwell said. “Heavier trucks take longer to stop and cause more damage when involved in crashes. Trucks using our square have difficulty with turning radius of existing corners going up over curbs or handicap accessible sidewalks. To permit those trucks to be longer would further (exacerbate) these problems. The sidewalks and corners of our square are used daily by schoolchildren going to Garfield Elementary and Claggett Middle schools.” Read More+…